Industry Focus

NAMMP

Department of Agriculture: Filling the Research Gap Program

The National Agricultural Manure Management Program (NAMMP)

The National Agricultural Manure Management Program (NAMMP) was developed to coordinate national research to estimate the agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions abatement potential for various manure management systems across the manure supply chain for Australian intensive livestock industries.

NAMMP is funded by the Department of Agriculture and is managed by Australian Pork Limited.  The program consists of six research projects.  Four research projects commenced in July 2012 and were completed on 1 June 2015.  Two additional projects commenced in July 2013 and will run until June 2016.

The six NAMMP research projects have been led by key researchers from the University of Western Australia, the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries Queensland, Feedlot Services Australia Pty Ltd, the University of Queensland and the Queensland University of Technology.

NAMMP has been supported by funding from the Australian Government, Australian Pork Limited,  Meat and Livestock Australia, Australian Egg Corporation Limited, Chicken Meat Program of Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation and, Dairy Australia.

Further support to the six projects has been provided by the Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, University of Western Australia, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries Queensland, University of Queensland, Feedlot Services Australia Pty Ltd, the University of Wollongong, the University of Queensland, CRC for High Integrity Australian Pork, Quantum Power Limited, the Queensland University of Technology, JBS Australia, The Organic Force, Department of Primary Industries Victoria, Horticulture Australia Limited, and Organic Nutrients Pty Ltd.

 

Project: Coordination of the NAMMP

This project has managed, directed and coordinated the NAMMP Program.  A significant number of research outcomes have been achieved which add to the basic understanding and quantification of Australian GHG emissions from Australian intensive livestock manure management and land application practices. This information will assist in verifying and updating factors in Australian National Greenhouse Accounts, update industry models, potentially change industry practices and provide baseline data for the possible development of a range of new Emissions Reduction Fund Methods.

About this Program

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Research Projects Completed (Research Term: 25 July 2012 to 1 June 2015)

A significant number of research outcomes have been achieved which add to the basic understanding and quantification of GHG emissions from intensive livestock manure management and land application practices. This information will assist in verifying and updating factors in Australian National Greenhouse Accounts, update industry models, and provide baseline data for the possible development of a range of new Emissions Reduction Fund Methods.  Potential methods will relate to emissions from piggery housing and effluent treatment, poultry nutrition and manure stockpile management, treatments to animal manures prior to land application and field management practices for the application of animal manures to soils.

 

Project: Mitigating the Greenhouse Gas Potential of Australian Soils Amended with Livestock Manure

This project evaluated the effectiveness of different mitigation strategies in reducing greenhouse gas emissions following the application of piggery, poultry or feedlot manure, in various forms, to land by measuring carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane fluxes from soils following amendment using laboratory and field studies. Results showed that lower application rates of manure has the potential  to reduce GHG emissions by 60%, with manure appearing to contribute to significant grain yield increases, irrespective of the type of manure.  Dry seeding and the incorporation of manures into the soils showed 25% and 75% GHG emission reductions respectively whilst composting and pelletising also showed significant reductions of GHG emissions of 70% and 80% respectively.

About this Program

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Project: Advancing Livestock Waste as Low Emission — High Efficiency Fertilizers

This project examined the reduction of greenhouse emissions through quantifying chemical and microbial gaseous emissions and identifying innovative managements for land applied manures (egg, chicken meat, pork, and beef) and fertiliser formulations (manure+smart-sorber technologies). Results found that sorbers decrease GHG emissions (N2O and NH3) substantially by up to 60% whilst potentially reducing the need for conventional fertiliser.  Sorbers were also found to improve agronomics (20%) and boost carbon retention in the soil by approximately 50%.

About this Program

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Project: Pork Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

Pig farmers have two attractive options to reduce greenhouse gas from conventional piggeries where pond covering is not feasible:

  1.  Change to deep litter housing;
  2. Change to short hydraulic retention time effluent treatment.

This project quantified the differences in greenhouse gas emissions from each system and compared these to emissions with conventional flushed housing and anaerobic ponds with long hydraulic retention time. Results showed that converting from the commonly used long hydraulic retention time ponds to a short hydraulic retention time system reduced GHG emissions by 87%. Converting to a deep litter system or a deep litter system with stockpiling also offered significant GHG mitigation of 85% and 65% respectively.

About this Program

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Project: Poultry Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

This project addressed knowledge gaps in greenhouse gas estimation based on changed feeding or manure management in the chicken meat and/or layer hen industries.  The project investigated the effects of bedding depth and dietary crude protein on greenhouse gas emissions in the chicken meat industry and the effects covering manure stockpiles in the layer industry. Results found that the poultry industry in general have very low GHG emissions with findings eight times lower than Australian accounts data. The meat chicken industry had very modest potential for reductions from both mitigation options of varied litter depth and crude protein reduction. The layer industry on the other hand has the potential to significantly reduce its GHG emission by approximately 88% by covering their manure stockpiles.

About this Program

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Active Research Projects (Research Term: 25 July 2013 to 30 June 2016)

Outcomes for Industry will be reported on for these projects at the conclusion of these projects.

 

Project: Composting as a Means of Minimising the GHG Emissions from the Manure Supply Chain

This project is investigating manure composting as a practice for minimising greenhouse gas emissions from intensive livestock industries and the manure supply chain. The project is comparing composting and stockpiling of manures to quantify reduction of methane and nitrous oxide emissions. It will provide emission factors that could be used to improve Australia’s National Greenhouse Gas Inventory. The project will also determine the potential to reduce nitrous oxide emissions through the application of composted instead of raw manures.

 

About this Program

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Project: Anaerobic Treatment for Emissions Reduction from Solid Manure Residues

This project is quantifying methane emissions from conventional storage and processing of solid manure residues and will develop a processing technology to stabilise solid residues by anaerobic digestion. Outcomes will prevent volatilisation during collection, storage and land application of the manure product.

About this Program

For additional information on this project, click here.